Friday, May 20, 2016

La Vie Parisienne

I spend a great deal of time (more than I'll willingly admit) looking at pretty vintage illustrations of costumes and historic ladies on the internet. Perhaps my favorite source is the early Twentieth Century publication La Vie Parisienne. The magazine was published in France and featured gorgeous illustrations by a number of the era's best-known artists, including Gerda Wegener (subject of the recent film The Danish Girl), famous art deco illustrator George Barbier, and Chéri Hérouard. It was quite scandalous in its day, as many of the illustrations were erotic in nature. All the same, they depicted plenty of whimsical situations and stylishly-dressed women. What I love most about them, however, is their use of subjects such as Eighteenth Century fashions, pierrots, and even impish little demons.

I thought I'd share a few of my favorites.



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I'll probably post more of these eventually, as I'm always finding new ones that I love.
In the meantime, you can find more art deco illustrations on my Pinterest
                                                     
  xx

Thursday, April 7, 2016

Haunting Little Lullabies

If there's one thing that has brought me immense comfort lately, it's music, primarily of the instrumental sort. One of my favorite pastimes is compiling playlists of my favorite songs from film soundtracks, with a handful of musically-similar tracks featuring vocals as accompaniment. My favorite sound, perhaps, is the gentle, lullaby-like melancholy of the giallo soundtrack. Giallo, if you aren't familiar with the term, refers to films in the horror and thriller genres primarily produced in Italy in the mid-to-late 1960s through 1970s. Many featured the most whimsical music, full of wispy female vocals and hauntingly beautiful piano flourishes. One of my most-loved composers, the renowned Ennio Morricone (who recently won his first Oscar for Best Original Score), provided the music for a number of giallos. I find myself listening to his pieces often, and put together a playlist of my favorite of his works. I also included songs from other giallos and more recent films, as well as tracks by artists like Joni Mitchell and Linda Perhacs, which I felt fit the tone of the playlist. I thought I'd share it as I consider it one of my best compilations.


Enjoy.





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(Still from Hatchet for the Honeymoon)


xx

Wednesday, March 23, 2016

What's In A Name?

Hullo!

I’m not quite sure why I never did this sooner, as it’s a long-overdue undertaking, but I am certainly excited to finally be embarking on this new venture. I’ve thought often of starting my own blog over the years, but lack of motivation, focus, and muddled, uncertain goals kept me from doing so. Now, however, I am quite confident that my future lies somewhere in the realm of art and design, and this seems a lovely place to document that journey and perhaps make some new acquaintances and connections along the way. More than anything, though, I hope that this will be a place to preserve those things that are dear to and inspire me. It seems I have an insatiable need to collect them, if my addiction to sites like Pinterest and Tumblr is any indication. So this blog will be a curiosity cabinet of sorts; a place to document and share my love of anything and everything pertaining to films, art, fashion, music, vintage, and whatever else catches my fancy.




I suppose that before I go any further, I should address the inevitable question: Why the name Patti O’Cleavis? It’s a moniker of my own imagining that I’ve adopted as a pseudonym of sorts, at least in the online world. When I was a child of maybe three or four, my father would allow me to accompany him on his weekend errands from time to time. While his trips might otherwise be terribly dull and boring to a young girl, one thing set them apart and made them so appealing: the promise that I would get to pick another tiny plastic toy dog to add to my ever-growing collection. I had a fondness for lining them up in a sort of parade down the hall (picture the toy animals in Briony’s room in the opening scene of Atonement). On one particular trip I selected an Irish Setter with a black and white coat. As we drove home, my father asked me what name I would bestow on my new acquisition. While I can’t vouch for the authenticity of his claim, as I don’t have a very vivid recollection of the event, my father now recounts that I promptly responded with “Patti O’Cleavis”. He was stunned by the abruptness and certainty of my answer. To this day it’s still unclear just how I managed to conjure such an Irish-sounding title seemingly out of thin air. I don’t even think I knew what breed the dog was, and I’m sure I had no notion whatsoever of what Irish surnames should sound like. Regardless, the name escaped my attention for years after, only surfacing in occasional retellings of the event. When it came time to establish an internet presence, I’m not sure what exactly made it come to mind. I do dearly love the sound of it, however.  

So that’s a bit of background to set the stage for what I hope will be my own curiosity cabinet for years to come. I hope you’ll join me and that you’ll love reading what little things I share as much as I’m certain I shall love sharing them. 

(I hope you won't find my style of writing too frivolous or pretentious, by the way - I try to be as natural as possible.)

xxx